The Changing Colonial Family

Like children all over Europe, children in the colonies were shaped by the social and political interests of their families. In addition, their lives were influenced by factors their parents could not have predicted before arrival. The high mortality rates in the Chesapeake for the first three-quarters of the seventeenth century meant that family structure initially lost the importance it held in England and the Northern colonies. All over the colonies, the lure of land farther west further divided families already disjointed by immigration to North America. By the mid-eighteenth century, however, most of these gaps had shrunk. Life in the Eastern colonies was as similar to life in Europe as families wanted it to be. The outbreak of the American Revolution upset all of these boundaries. Some families were split by political differences. Others were divided by death and long military campaigns. Few families were unaffected by a war fought throughout the colonies. When the war and the turmoil of starting a new country finally ended, family life reestablished itself. New ideas about how children and childhood were defined continued to evolve through the nineteenth century. Abigail B. Chandler See also: Child Rearing; Education; Family; Reading and Literacy; Document: Raising Colonial Children (1699). Bibliography Fischer, David Hackett. Albion’s Seed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1989. Greven, Philip J. “Family Structure in Seventeenth-Century Andover, Massachusetts.” In Colonial America: Essays in Politics and Social Development, edited by Stanley N. Katz, John M. Murrin, and Douglas Greenberg. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1993. Illick, Joseph E. “Child-Rearing in Seventeenth-Century England and America.” In The History of Childhood: The Untold Story of Child Abuse, edited by Lloyd deMause. New York: Peter Bedrick, 1988. Levy, Barry, and James Baker. “Tender Plants’: Quaker Farmers and Children in the Delaware Valley.” In Colonial America: Essays in Politics and Social Development, edited by Stanley N. Katz, John M. Murrin, and Douglas Greenberg. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1993. Marten, James, ed. Children in Colonial America. New York: New York University Press, 2007. Pollock, Linda A. Forgotten Children. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1983. Sommerville, C. John. The Rise and Fall of Childhood. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage Publications, 1982. Walzer, John F. “A Period of Ambivalence: Eighteenth-Century American Childhood.” In The History of Childhood: The Untold Story of Child Abuse, edited by Lloyd deMause. New York: Peter Bedrick, 1988. fudanbook holidaymapq

The Changing Colonial Family Photo Gallery



Presentation “HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON1 CIVICS IN PRACTICE … holidaymapq

First Families of Virginia – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia holidaymapq

Leave a Reply

− 4 = 1