Land of Opportunities of colonial America

The development of the colonial economy depended upon a variety of factors, including the relationship between land and labor, the development of export agriculture, colonial consumption, credit and available currency, and a growing and diverse population. Economic expansion fulfilled the colonial role within England’s imperial system while providing the colonists with not only a means of survival but, in time, prosperity. This economic growth depended upon the colonists’ ability to utilize effectively, or exploit, a variety of labor systems, but the benefits were not equally shared. The American Revolution did not dramatically alter economic relations in the new nation, in the way that later revolutions in France and Russia did. Other than loyalists, the elite in the former colonies did not see their land or property taken from them. Still, the Revolution did expand economic opportunities, by lifting imperial restrictions on manufacturing and westward expansion. Ty M. Reese Bibliography Bailyn, Bernard. The New England Merchants in the Seventeenth Centuries. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1955. Berlin, Ira. Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998. Brewer, John. The Sinews of Power: War, Money and the English State, 1688 1783. New York: Random House, 1989. Clemens, Paul G. E. The Atlantic Economy and Colonial Maryland’s Eastern Shore: From Tobacco to Grain. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1980. Curtin, Philip D. The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex: Essays in Atlantic History. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1990. Davis, Ralph. The Rise of the Atlantic Economies. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1973. Dickerson, Oliver. The Navigation Acts and the American Revolution. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1951. Doerflinger, Thomas. A Vigorous Spirit of Enterprise: Merchants and Economic Development in Revolutionary Philadelphia. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1986. Dunn, Richard. Sugar and Slaves: The Rise of the Planter Class in the English West Indies, 1624 1713. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1972. Galenson, David W. Traders, Planters, and Slaves: Market Behavior in Early English America. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1986. Hancock, David. Citizens of the World: London Merchants and the Integration of the British Atlantic Community, 1735 1785. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1995. Innes, Stephen. Creating the Commonwealth: The Economic Culture of Puritan New England. New York: W. W. Norton, 1995. Innes, Stephen, ed. Work and Labor in Early America. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1988. Kulikoff, Allan. From British Peasants to Colonial American Farmers. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2000. Liss, Peggy K. Atlantic Empires: The Network of Trade and Revolution, 1713 1826. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1983. McCusker, John J., and Russell Menard. The Economy of British America, 1607 1789. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1985. Merrell, James H. The Indian’s New World: Catawbas and Their Neighbors From European Contact Through the Era of Removal. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1989. Morgan, Edmund. American Slavery American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia. New York: W. W. Norton, 1975. Morris, Richard B. Government and Labor in Early America. New York: Columbia University Press, 1946. Vickers, Daniel. Farmers and Fishermen: Two Centuries of Work in Essex County, Massachusetts, 1630 1850. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1994. Wallerstein, Immanuel. The Modern World System: Mercantilism and the Consolidation of the European World Economy, 1600 1750. New York: Academic Press, 1980. Williams, Eric. Capitalism and Slavery. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1944. Introduction to American Colonial History Why is America considered the land of opportunity? Voting in Early America : The Colonial Williamsburg Official …

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