Holiday in Nei Mongol – Nei Mongol Travel

Holiday in Nei Mongol – Nei Mongol Travel for See fig. FIG A section of the frieze from the Arch of Titus in Rome commemorating the Roman conquest of Jerusalem. Note the trumpets to the right. Image credit Yonidebest and Steerpike, Wikimedia Commons. The comet at this time would have been around degrees long, stretching across half the sky. Having played the part of Sagittarius’s arrow that slayed the Scorpion at the end of August, the gloriously bright comet may have seemed to assume a new role to mark the beginning of the new Jewish civil year and the Feast of Trumpets. The long-tailed comet may well have looked to observers like an awesome celestial trumpet, with the coma being the mouthpiece figs During the whole time from sunset to moonset, the Moon may have appeared to observers to be playing the part of the trumpeter blowing into the trumpet’s mouthpiece, proclaiming Rosh Hashanah and the start of the civil New Year. Holiday in Nei Mongol – Nei Mongol Travel 2016.

Holiday in Nei Mongol – Nei Mongol Travel Photo Gallery



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